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Why E-Cigarettes are more Harmful than we think

                                         
Vaping is the new smoking
Quitting an addiction is a great idea and you deserve a pat on the back for contemplating it. But starting a new addiction even if in the form of an electronic, chargeable 'smoking' device, to let go of an existing one, is plain stupidity. What's more? In recent times, many non-smoking teenagers and youths, globally, have made vaping their addiction. 

Cancer
The toxic compounds in e-cigarettes may lead to cancer. Limited yet substantial evidence concerning e-cigarettes suggests that the toxic substances in their liquid might increase a user's risk of developing cancer. It says that these harmful compounds could result in the increase in heart rate owing to the presence of nicotine and that chemicals in e-cigarettes' aerosols may lead to DNA damage and mutagenesis.

Respiratory health
Because electronic smoking is, after all, smoking. Long-term vaping among teens and young adults could lead to increased coughing and wheezing among them, and may also worsen asthma symptoms. Additionally, the presence of ultra-fine particles, flavorants, and even metals, could damage lung cells, and lead to several respiratory health issues. Further, the latest study findings suggest that vaping can damage vital immune-system cells.

Vaping could damage vital immune system cells
Researchers extracted alveolar macrophage cells from lung tissue. They exposed a third of these to plain e-cigarette fluid, a third to different strengths of the artificially vaped condensate with and without nicotine, and a third was exposed to nothing for 24 hours.

The results showed that the condensate was significantly more harmful to the cells than e-cigarette fluid and that these effects worsened as the 'dose' increased.

Exposure to the condensate increased cell death and boosted production of oxygen free radicals 50-fold and significantly increased the production of inflammatory chemicals. 

                                              
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