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How Does Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program Help People With COPD?


When you’re living with COPD, everyday activities such as walking or climbing stairs can get harder. That’s where pulmonary rehabilitation comes in.

Basically, it’s a formal program that will build your fitness and help you breathe as well as you possibly can. Pulmonary rehab will help you with:
  • Exercise
  • Breathing techniques
  • Nutrition
  • Relaxation
  • Emotional and group support
  • Learning more about your medications
  • Strategies for living better with COPD
Exercise

The key to any pulmonary rehab program for COPD is exercise, which will help your lungs and heart work better. Here’s some more about these exercises, which may be one-on-one with a trainer or in a group

Lower body: 
Most rehab centers offer a set of exercises that center on leg workouts. They vary from simply walking on a treadmill or around a track to more intense stair climbing. Most of the proven benefits of pulmonary rehab are shown in studies of people doing leg exercises.


Upper body: 
The muscles in the upper body are important for breathing, as well as for daily activities. Arm and chest exercises might include turning a crank against resistance or just lifting your arms against gravity.


Breathing: 
Blowing through a mouthpiece against resistance may increase the strength of your breathing muscles. These exercises may be helpful for people with very weak breathing muscles.


Strength training: 
Most pulmonary rehab exercises focus on building endurance. Adding strength training, such as lifting weights, has been shown to be helpful as well.

Educate Yourself
Many pulmonary rehab programs offer group or one-on-one education sessions to help you learn to better manage your COPD. Sessions might focus on things such as:
  • Understanding your Medication treatment plan. This includes using your inhaler the right way and using it regularly.
  • How to get the most out of oxygen therapy if you are using this treatment
  • If you’re a smoker, help with quitting
  • Eating a healthy diet
Emotional Support
People with severe COPD have a great chance of being depressed or anxious. This can make you less interested in pleasurable activities, including sex. Some pulmonary rehab programs offer relaxation training and counselling. You’ll also get a chance to meet other people who have COPD and share your questions and feelings.

What You Get Out of a Program

Most people who finish a pulmonary rehab course feel better at the end. You’re usually able to do more things without becoming short of breath. In a large analysis of some programs, nearly all people in pulmonary rehab had seen their symptoms get better. Almost all of them reported feeling
  • Less short of breath
  • More energetic
  • More in control of their COPD
Being in rehab may help prevent you from going to the hospital because of COPD flare-ups, or exacerbations. Even people with advanced lung disease can get something out of rehabilitation program.

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